I moved Shuttr to Windows Azure a year or so ago and I've been very impressed with the platform. It's been fast, stable, reliable, etc. There have been numerous reductions to their pricing model which have made it a lot more palatable.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure/archive/2012/03/08/announcing-reduced-pricing-on-windows-azure-storage-and-compute.aspx

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure/archive/2011/10/27/microsoft-lowers-storage-cost-for-blob-and-table-storage-in-windows-azure.aspx

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure/archive/2012/02/14/announcing-reduced-pricing-on-sql-azure-and-new-100mb-database-option.aspx

With these new pricing reductions we now have a full testing environment up in Azure permanently with a 100MB SQL Azure database and an extra small web role. It's virtually free for that. Shuttr's main expense is storage given that we store a ton of high resolution photos, so these improvements are greatly helping our business.

I'm super happy with the platform, but what I really want is integration and a focus from Microsoft on supporting Azure.

Why can I not run Windows Server 8 Beta on Azure?

This would get a lot of people playing with .NET 4.5, ASP.NET MVC 4, IIS 8, WebSockets, etc. Azure could be a cutting edge place to develop. Instead I'm sure it will be much like last time. Windows Server 2008 R2 came out on October 22, 2009. The first time it was available on Azure was with Azure Guest OS 2.0 which was released in November 22, 2010. It took 13 months to come out.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure/archive/2010/04/07/upcoming-support-in-windows-azure-for-net-framework-4.aspx

.NET 4 took 90 days after RTM to come out. This is atrocious. IMO it should be available the day the beta is available and updated to the release version the day it's out. You're Microsoft, you can make this happen.

Why are there no Azure Tools for Visual Studio 11 Beta?

Again, the Visual Studio team obviously either does not communicate with the Azure team or there is simply no priority for Azure support in Visual Studio. Instead we get an article telling us that the way to develop on Azure with Visual Studio 11 is to install Visual Studio 2010 as well, make some hacks, and then install the Azure tools. Brutal.

Azure users are already cutting edge, they're building apps in the cloud! Azure users want to be able to use cutting edge software. Want to really push Azure? Release there first! Don't make us wait until well after these things are released. Not being able to start playing with your latest languages, frameworks and development tools is a serious kick to the junk.